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Archive for the ‘hip hop’ Category


Everything is everything
What is meant to be, will be
After winter, must come spring
Change, it comes eventually

Everything is everything
What is meant to be, will be
After winter, must come spring
Change, it comes eventually

I wrote these words for everyone
Who struggles in their youth
Who wont accept deception
Instead of what is truth
It seems we lose the game,
Before we even start to play
Who made these rules? were so confused
Easily led astray
Let me tell ya that
Everything is everything
Everything is everything
After winter, must come spring
Everything is everything

I philosophy
Possibly speak tongues
Beat drum, abyssinian, street baptist
Rap this in fine linen
From the beginning
My practice extending across the atlas
I begat this
Flippin in the ghetto on a dirty mattress
You cant match this rapper / actress
More powerful than two cleopatras
Bomb graffiti on the tomb of nefertiti
Mcs aint ready to take it to the serengeti
My rhymes is heavy like the mind of sister betty
L. boogie spars with stars and constellations
Then came down for a little conversation
Adjacent to the king, fear no human being
Roll with cherubims to nassau coliseum
Now hear this mixture
Where hip hop meets scripture
Develop a negative into a positive picture

Now, everything is everything
What is meant to be, will be
After winter, must come spring
Change, it comes eventually

Sometimes it seems
Well touch that dream
But things come slow or not at all
And the ones on top, wont make it stop
So convinced that they might fall
Lets love ourselves then we cant fail
To make a better situation
Tomorrow, our seeds will grow
All we need is dedication

Let me tell ya that,
Everything is everything
Everything is everything
After winter, must come spring
Everything is everything

Everything is everything
What is meant to be, will be
After winter, must come spring
Change, it comes eventually

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gangsta rap

Gangsta rap (1986- ) is the main form of hip hop music listened to by white Americans, who buy most of it. It is the sort of hip hop done by acts like Ice T, NWA, Ice Cube, Dr Dre, Snoop Dogg, Jay-Z and Eminem. It is famous for holding women and the law in low regard.

Gangsta rap is a white form of hip hop. Sure, the performers are nearly all black, but who is the audience? Follow the money. It is not music by blacks for blacks, but by blacks for whites.

When it comes to race, America has changed hugely since 1950. So maybe whites at last can enjoy black music in and of itself and not in some form that has been changed for them.

But if whites are suddenly so colour-blind, then why does gangsta rap play to the worst images that whites have about blacks – as violent and oversexed? Is it because they are true? Is this what KRS-One meant when he said the essence of rap is to interpret the consciousness of the people? Or is it just what white people like to buy and hear?

Look at the cover of Snoop Dogg’s “Doggystyle” (1993), the album that made his name. It has a naked black woman sticking her head in a doghouse. This is just how white men have seen black women for hundreds of years: as animals, as faceless sex objects, as something to rape. It looks like something straight out of the Jim Crow museum. The minstrel show is back in town.

Gangsta rap did not create racism, but it has become its well-paid handmaiden. Helping white people everywhere feel good about themselves. And putting pictures in everyone’s heads about black people that will be there for a long, long time.

But what about all those songs about violence against the police? Surely they at least are “black”.

Blacks in cities have no great love for the police, it is true, but songs about killing them is not natural to black America. Music is something that comes from churches and clubs where such themes would be out of place. But they are not out of place for a 13-year-old white boy sitting in his room, hating how he has to listen to his parents, his teachers and the law. It is as old as rock music.

The themes common to gangsta rap – women as sex objects, drugs and violence – come from rock music by way of the Beastie Boys, not from black music.

The general sound and feeling of gangsta rap is so close to rock music that Jay-Z and Linkin Park, a rock band, could do a song together. It sounded surprisingly natural. Ice T, one of the founders of gangsta rap, even had a heavy metal rock band, Body Count.

Not all of gangsta rap is a coon show, of course. Tupac Shakur is an example. But too much of it is – and the rest of hip hop is not completely innocent either.

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So everywhere I go yo, fans be like “Where you from?”
You know, whether it be New York or the UK
And I be like ummm… “I’m from DC”
Yeah, and they don’t believe it, you know
So I just tell them this right here
“Let the beat rock, let the beat rock, let the beat rock…”
I said “Let it rock…”
“I’m from DC, I’m from DC”

I be rollin’ with some dudes that always love to break the motherfucking rules
And yeah, know a couple D’s that’ll stir the shoes right off your motherfucking feet
Yeah, they be goin’ hard all in the streets, make sure they don’t take your heart
Naw, not little me I got the lead part, I’m a fittin’ to shoot the movie
G’s, bammers on the block been there for years, I don’t think it’s ever gonna stop
No, they been getting’ doses, just say no, might as well say hell yeah
And yeah, I’m from North-East, Langdon Park, don’t remember Trinidad for me
So, let the beat rock, let the beat rock, let the beat rock
I said, let it rock
I’m from DC

Sure, everybody this, everybody that
But I know that them cats poor
And yeah, as a matter of fact everybody rap but they ain’t doin’ no tours
And uh, what the fuck is that bammers on the bus, but they rappin’ ’bout they dope cars
Naw, I’m a point ’em out babe, I’m a point ’em out babe
Bammers think they hard just ’cause they saw a little Scarface movie
Naw, girls think they hot just ’cause they got a little couple dudes on them
Naw, this what a dude why I make sure I don’t mother fucking talk to them
So, let the beat rock, let the beat rock, let the beat rock
I said, let it rock
I’m from DC

If you lookin’ for a man that’s on his two feet standing
You can go with me, you can go with me
If you wanna make it big and you wanna hang with the cool kids
You can roll with me, you can roll with me
You can roll with me, you can roll with me

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L’Trimm (1988-1991), made up of rappers Lady Tigra and Bunny D, was a one-hit wonder known for the song “Cars With The Boom” (1988 ). Nearly 20 years later the song holds up surprisingly well.

Their bubblegum form of old school hip hop never caught on. In fact, it was the complete opposite of the gangsta rap that did take over by the middle 1990s.

Their music was not one bit street. It was completely unserious, but that was part of its charm. Unlike other female rappers, Tigra and Bunny sounded like girls, like airhead high school girls, in fact.

L’Trimm was part of the Miami Bass music scene, which gave us 2 Live Crew. Even though Miami Bass affected later forms of hip hop, like crunk, it never caught on nationwide. That helped to put an end to L’Trimm.

The name “L’Trimm” came from Trim jeans, but made to sound French.

Lady Tigra (Rachel de Rougemont) and Bunny D (Elana Cager) lived in Kendall, a suburb of Miami, and became friends in high school. They appeared as dancers on the television show “Miami Teen Express”.

The rapper Mighty Rock used to drive them home from school. One day he had to stop at Hot Productions. There Paul Klein heard the girls rapping. When he saw how pretty they were he thought they would make a good act. They recorded some songs.

Then one day they heard a song of theirs on the radio. They were shocked. They called Klein. He said, “What do you think we did all this for?!” and hung up.

The song “Grab It!” (1988 ) did well in Miami. Soon after “Cars With the Boom” came out, which was a hit across the country. I remember seeing it on The Box in New York.

L’Trimm came out with three discs of songs:

  • 1988: Grab It
  • 1989: Drop That Bottom
  • 1991: Groovy

Only the first one is still in print. It has both “Grab It!” and “Cars With the Boom”. The other two were not as good.

While making “Groovy” L’Trimm wanted to move in the direction of house music but Hot Productions had other ideas. So L’Trimm walked off, never to record again. Hot Productions already had enough for “Groovy”, but it did not sell well.

Bunny moved to Indiana, got married, settled down and had four children.

Tigra moved to New York, where she helped to run a nightclub. In 2007 she came out with some new songs, which you can hear on her MySpace page. She also did “The Pinkberry Song”, which you can hear on pinkberry.com. Sounds just like the old Tigra.

In 2005 Jay R came out with the song “My Other Car Is a Beatle”. It has L’Trimm rapping “Cars With The Boom” over Gary Numan’s new wave rock song “Cars” (1979) with a bit of the Beatles’ “Drive My Car” (1965) thrown in. Who knew that three songs about cars could sound so good together?

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Bunny D and Lady Tigra, 1990.

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