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Archive for the ‘1987’ Category

Remarks:

I had completely forgotten about this song because it does not appear on any of my Janet Jackson albums. Lisa Keith is the lead singer. It “sounds” like a Janet Jackson song – like maybe something towards the end of “Rhythm Nation 1814” (1989) – because it was produced by Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis at about the same time.

This song reached #7 on the R&B charts in 1987. You may have heard it being sampled in other songs.

Lyrics:

Making love
in the rain,
I can’t believe the joy it brings me.

Making love all alone,
I hear the rain on my window.

It’s just a little thing,
but it means so much to me.

Our bodies together,
while the rain plays a melody.

Every raindrop makes think of you.
(Wishing you were close to me)

There is nothing that I’d rather do than…
Making love in the rain,
I can’t believe the joy it brings me.

When we’re done – all alone,
I hear the rain on my window.

When it’s stormy outside,
It’s warm in my heart,
with you in my arms.

And when your away from me,
I wish it would rain,
’cause its always the same

Every raindrop makes think of you.
(Wishing you were close to me)

There is nothing that I’d rather do than…
Making love in the rain,
I can’t believe the joy it brings me.
(I can’t believe)

When I’m here all alone,
I hear the rain on my window.
(On my window)

Making love in the rain,
I can’t believe the joy it brings me.

Making love all alone,
I hear the rain on my window.
(On my window, I hear the raindrops fall)

Every raindrop makes think of you.
(Wishing you were close to me)

There is nothing that I’d rather do than…
(Nothing that I’d rather do than)
Making love in the rain,
I can’t believe the joy it brings me.
(Making love. oohh making love)

When we’re here all alone,
I hear the rain on my window.
(On my window, I hear it rain)

Making love in the rain,
I can’t believe the joy it brings me
(ooohhhh, yeah)

All alone I hear the rain.
(I hear the rain)

My love here comes the rain.
My love here comes the rain.
My love here comes the rain.
My love here comes the rain.

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Remarks:

This is my favourite Anita Baker song.  Even when I first heard it it seemed like a song I had known for years. It only made it to #8 on the R&B chart.

At the very beginning of the video you can see Donnie Simpson, the host of “Video Soul” on BET in the 1980s and 1990s. The video shows scenes of Detroit.

Lyrics:

Flashbacks of the times we’ve had
Some made us laugh some made us sad
We used to break up to make up
All the fun that came from those love games
Oh well, I think I need someone new
Oh, it just won’t do, because I think about you baby

From beginning to end 365 days of the year
I want your same ole love
All I want to do is keep on loving you
I want your same ole love

There’s a reason I feel this way
All the things you do, well it might be the things that you say
Your love never changes
It’s like a picture in a frame, and it remains the same

Your undying love for me
Oh it keeps me strong, keeps me holding on

From beginning to end 365 days of the year
I want your same ole love
All I want to do is keep on loving you
I want your same ole love

Slowly, love me
All is forsaken, I love the love we’re making
Cause it’s truly lovely
I’ll never leave you, you’ll know I need you baby

From beginning to end 365 days of the year
I want your same ole love
All I want to do is keep on loving you
I want your same ole love

From beginning to end 365 days of the year
I want your same ole love
All I want to do is keep on loving you
I want your same ole love

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Remarks:

Ah, the 1980s: Jheri curls, cheap-sounding electronic music, all of it. I had completely forgotten about this song till I heard it the other day on AOL Radio. But because I had forgotten it, it brings up memories and feelings from that time more perfectly than better, more famous songs. Like a fly in amber. Like “Ice Cream Paint Job” in 22 years, no doubt.

I remember this line better than the song itself: “Those other girls don’t matter no they can’t spoil my view.”

The song went to #1 on the American R&B charts in 1987. It is used as period music in a great scene in “Love and Basketball” (2000).

Lyrics:

Hey lady let me tell you why,
Icant live my life without you,oh baby
everytime I see you walking by i get a thrill
you dont notice me but in time you will,I must make you
understand…..

I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)
I wanna be your man (I do yeah,yeah)
I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)
I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)

Better not pass me by,cause if you do you’ll lose a good
thing, (oh baby) Cause what I got to say is sealed with a kiss
and a wedding ring
(wedding ring)
My mind is blind at times
I can’t see any one but you
Those other girls don’t matter no they can’t spoil my view
I must make you understand…..

I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)
I wanna be your man (I do yeah,yeah)
I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)
I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)

I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)
I wanna be your man (I do yeah,yeah)
I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)
I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)

Words can never say what I feel, (it’s too intense)
oh oh oh oh. I tried I tried I tried I tried to tell you
how I feel,but I get mixed up (soo mixed up)
my mind is blind at times I cant see anyone but you,those other
girls dont matter no they cant spoil my view,I must make you
understand…..

I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)
I wanna be your man (I do yeah,yeah)
I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)
I wanna be your man (I wanna be your man)

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This is from 1987. There is a good chance I saw her then – it was a show I watched – but like the audience there I would not have thought much of her! But in less than ten years she would become huge, more powerful than two Cleopatras.

See also:

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Here is something I wrote to a friend in August 1987 about the difference between West 111th and 109th Streets in Manhattan. In those days 111th had been mostly gentrified but 109th not:

… I walked back up Broadway and for a change of scene I turned right at 109th Street, left onto Amsterdam Avenue and then left again on 111th Street to get back to Broadway.

The difference between 109th and 111th was amazing.

It was early Friday evening, the sun had gone down but light was still in the sky, and 109th was full of people: men sitting at card tables on the sidewalk playing dominoes, boys on bicycles, girls standing together talking, parents sitting on steps, a boy sticking his hand into the low spray of a fire hydrant, people talking, music playing, black kids and white kids playing together. It was a neighbourhood in the true sense as opposed to a street of buildings where people live next to each other.

I went up two blocks and turned down 111th Street. It was like another world. It was quiet and almost dead: one boy on his bicycle, a couple walking their dog, two girls leaning out the window watching their father taking out the trash. Both Hispanics and Anglos live on this street, but the minute I turned the corner onto 111th Street I could tell it was mainly Anglo: it was so dead. Dogs and cats take the place of children. People sitting apart in their air-conditioned rooms takes the place of a true neighbourhood.

I have seen this difference before: a black neighbourhood in the city is full of life while white suburbs are not just quiet but almost dead: you can walk down a street and hardly see anyone. The only way you can tell people live there is that the grass is cut and cars are parked. But you almost think they had all died an hour ago of some strange disease – like in some science fiction story about the end of the world.

People get down on the city and lately I have been getting sick of it myself, but things like 109th Street restore my faith. And yet in five or ten years 109th will be gone, a memory: it will be gentrified and become a street of air-conditioned yuppies instead of a street of laughing children.

This difference between white gentrifiers and others was not just something I imagined. Here is how many white gentrifiers see Harlem in 2008 according to a New York Times article:

And many new residents are uncomfortable with Harlem’s noisy street life, including sidewalk barbecues that can draw large crowds. Some believe there are too many churches on the one hand – Harlem has more than 100 houses of worship – and a casual flouting of the law on the other, with people littering, double-parking and drinking alcohol on the street.

See also:

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My name is Luka
I live on the second floor
I live upstairs from you
Yes I think you’ve seen me before

If you hear something late at night
Some kind of trouble. some kind of fight
Just don’t ask me what it was
Just don’t ask me what it was
Just don’t ask me what it was

I think it’s because I’m clumsy
I try not to talk too loud
Maybe it’s because I’m crazy
I try not to act too proud

They only hit until you cry
And after that you don’t ask why
You just don’t argue anymore
You just don’t argue anymore
You just don’t argue anymore

Yes I think I’m okay
I walked into the door again
Well, if you ask that’s what I’ll say
And it’s not your business anyway
I guess I’d like to be alone
With nothing broken, nothing thrown

Just don’t ask me how I am
Just don’t ask me how I am
Just don’t ask me how I am

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Jody Watley

Jody Watley (1959- ) is an American R & B singer, best known for the songs “Looking for a New Love” (1986) and, when she was with Shalamar, “The Second Time Around” (1980). She won the Grammy for Best New Artist in 1987.

Here are her songs that made it to the top ten on the American R & B chart (note that she was with Shalamar from 1977 to 1984):

  • 1977: Uptown Festival (Part 1) (#10)
  • 1980: The Second Time Around (#1)
  • 1981: Make That Move (#6)
  • 1982: A Night to Remember (#8 )
  • 1983: Dead Giveaway (#10)
  • 1986: Looking for a New Love (#1)
  • 1987: Still a Thrill (#3)
  • 1987: Don’t You Want Me (#3)
  • 1988: Some Kind of Lover (#3)
  • 1989: Real Love (#1)
  • 1989: Friends (#3)
  • 1989: Everything (#3)
  • 1991: I Want You (#5)
  • 1996: This is for the Lover in You (#2)

She was also in “Do They Know It’s Christmas” (1984). She hates her hair in that video but is proud she helped to feed children in Africa.

She has been in the music business since 1977. Thirty years and 20 million discs later she can still hit the top of the dance charts: in 2007 her remake of the Chic song “I Want Your Love” became a number one dance song.

She was never as big as Madonna or Janet Jackson, but neither did she present herself as a loose woman like they did. Through it all she has remained true to herself, putting out what she considers to be good music rather than the terrible stuff the record companies wanted her to make.

She has her own music company, Avitone. Through it she has been searching for a new business model, one to take the place of selling music on discs, which is dying out.

Her music has changed little over the years. In 2007 it was not all that different from the dance music of the late 1970s that she started out in.

While she was one of the first R & B singers to have a rap in her song (“Friends”), she never took part in the marriage of R & B and hip hop the way that Mary J Blige and others later did.

For some reason I thought she was an army brat. In fact her father was a Pentecostal minister. Her mother sang and played the piano in church. They moved all over the country: Chicago (where she was born and won Best Smile in Miss Black Teen Aged Illinois), Washington, DC, Kansas City, Texas, Indiana and Los Angeles. She saw the violence that broke out in Washington after Martin Luther King was killed.

In the early 1970s she became a dancer on “Soul Train” and even taught Aretha Franklin some moves!

Her godfather was the great Jackie Wilson.

She was the first black woman ever to appear on the cover of a Japanese fashion magazine.

She was once married to Andre Cymone.

Her heroes: Grace Jones, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Prince, Nikki Giovanni, Maya Angelou, Richard Branson, Steve Jobs, Chic and the Carpenters.

See also:

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